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  • Historical Significance
    10
    ON
    1900-present

    See the Task: "Events that Shaped Canadian Identity." This grade 10 task is exactly the same as the Academic Grade 10 History task with the exception of a different rubric for assessing student work from students who are enrolled in the Applied course. It also has student work from the "Applied" course.

  • Historical Significance
    9
    AB
    1700-1800, 1800-1900, 1900-present

    Funding and support for the development of this lesson plan is the result of a grant from Alberta Education to support implementation of the K-12 Social Studies curriculum. Financial and in-kind support was also provided by the Calgary Regional Consortium (www.crcpd.ab.ca).

    This lesson helps students understand why First Nation peoples have collective rights guaranteed in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms by exploring the historical roots of these rights. The lesson begins with students doing research on various treaties and the Indian Act, in order to gain the necessary background information as to why these documents were created. As they progress through the lesson, students are required to conduct research, complete a presentation, and determine which document was most significant in impacting the lives of First Nations peoples. As an extension activity, students can make a list of recommendations to amend The Indian Act or a specific treaty.

  • Historical Perspectives
    9
    AB
    1800-1900, 1900-present

    Funding and support for the development of this lesson plan is the result of a grant from Alberta Education to support implementation of the K-12 Social Studies curriculum. Financial and in-kind support was also provided by the Calgary Regional Consortium (www.crcpd.ab.ca).

    Students explore the multiple perspectives that existed at the time of the signing of various treaties and the Indian Act (circa 1876), and then create a political cartoon to demonstrate these various viewpoints. They will create a political cartoon on either a specific treaty or The Indian Act that shows the perspective of First Nations peoples, the government, and non-native Canadians. Students also provide an explanation of the message of their cartoon and the techniques they used to transmit this message, and peer review another student's cartoon.

    FN Cartoon Exceeds Expectations
    FN Cartoon Meets Expectations
    FN Cartoon Falls Below
  • Primary Source Evidence
    5
    MB
    Pre-1600

    Small groups of students will identify artifacts, or images of artifacts that were used by various First Peoples' groups, and use these artifacts as evidence to tell us about the lives of the people.

  • Historical Significance
    7, 8
    ON
    Pre-1600, 1600-1700, 1700-1800, 1800-1900, 1900-present

    For students to present projects at a Historica Fair, teachers generally prepare students by providing instruction in a number of areas. These tend to include research techniques, report writing, media literacy, and oral presentation skill development. The pre activities presented here are intended to develop an understanding of the concept of Historical Significance, so that students can incorporate it into their Fair presentations.

What is a Benchmark?

<p>John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising &amp; Marketing History,<br />Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections</p>

A surveyor cut a "benchmark" into a stone or a wall when measuring the altitude and/or level of a tract of land. A bracket called a "bench" was secured in the cut to mount the surveying equipment, and all subsequent measurements were made in reference to the position and height of that mark.

The term "benchmark" was first used around 1842 to refer to a standard of quality by which achievement may be measured.

The foundation documents available through the Benchmarks site attempt to help teachers establish standards for assessing student learning of the modes of thought that constitute historical thinking.

John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History,
Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections